Speed dating planning

Men and women are rotated to meet each other over a series of short "dates" usually lasting from three to eight minutes depending on the organization running the event.

This lesson plan focuses on conversational practice to encourage English learners to use a wide variety of language functions such as demanding explanations, making complaints, giving warning, etc.

The activity used is a variation on the popular practice of speed dating.

Speed dating is a formalized matchmaking process whose purpose is to encourage eligible singles to meet large numbers of new potential partners in a very short period of time.

It was created in 1998 by Antony Beilinsohn (a Los Angeles based television executive) after his Rabbi, Yaacov Deyo, encouraged him to conceive of innovative ways for eligible jewish singles to meet and marry.

Other studies found speed-dating data useful as a way to observe individual choices among random participants.

A 2005 study at the University of Pennsylvania of multiple Hurry Date speed dating events found that most people made their choices within the first three seconds of meeting.

Requirement for each event vary with the organizer.

Specific age range based on gender is a common restriction for events.

According to the New York Times, participants in speed dating experience an average of 2 in 10 or 3 in 10 matches.

Online dating participants, in contrast, only find a compatible match with 1 in 100 or fewer of the profiles they study.

Because the matching itself happens after the event, people do not feel pressured to select or reject each other in person.

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